theparisreview:

“Whoever alighted upon the virus as a metaphor for computer trouble was shrewd, but cruel. To declare that a computer can ‘get sick’ … is a stroke of empathetic genius; to this kid, at least, it transformed the prospect from one of mild inconvenience to hysterical terror.”
Dan Piepenbring on living in fear of the Melissa virus, first launched fifteen years ago.

theparisreview:

“Whoever alighted upon the virus as a metaphor for computer trouble was shrewd, but cruel. To declare that a computer can ‘get sick’ … is a stroke of empathetic genius; to this kid, at least, it transformed the prospect from one of mild inconvenience to hysterical terror.”

Dan Piepenbring on living in fear of the Melissa virus, first launched fifteen years ago.

instagram:

The Penny-Sized Illustrations of @samlarson

To see more photos of both Sam’s normal-sized and minuscule work, follow @samlarson on Instagram.

"I gather my inspiration from the American West," says Sam Larson (@samlarson), a 25-year-old Wisconsin native now working as a freelance artist in Carlsbad, California. “I like to get out into the mountains and desert whenever possible.” On Instagram, Sam shares his western-themed creations, which often take the form of tiny, penny-sized drawings.

Sam attributes his rekindled interest in illustration to Instagram. In 2013, after a five-year hiatus from art, “I started doing one drawing a night to post on Instagram. It was an exercise that held me accountable, and the encouragement helped keep me going.”

"Instagram has allowed me to make new friends, travel to places I didn’t know existed, share my art and so much more," says Sam. "I hope to inspire people to pick up a pen, or to embark on some type of adventure."

fastcompany:

Adidas and Nike are in a foot race to see who can perfect a knit—not sewn—shoe that will wastes less material and doesn’t need as much cheap labor to make.

(via npr)

laughingsquid:

Hubble Space Telescope Accidentally Creates Modern Art Thanks to Tracking System Error

Tags: space art

npr:

iowawomensarchives:

"Today’s Girls Love Pink Bows as Playthings, but These Shoot" claims a recent New York Times article about archery’s current pop culture moment, thanks to the Hunger Games trilogy and Disney’s “Brave.” But as these 1940s images from the University of Iowa suggest, the latest resurgence is part of a longer tradition of female participation in the sport:

[Archery] had been a popular female sport for many centuries, with such famous archers as Anne Boleyn and Elizabeth I. Women’s participation in archery did not breech any standards of propriety for young students. Archery was elegant and graceful, and women could participate outdoors, while corseted and dressed fashionably, and without having to wear the shocking bloomers… [Student experimentation] in competitive, individual sports such as fencing, archery, tennis, golf, and bicycling… were important for paving the way to more competitive and vigorous women’s sports. — Bright Epoch: Women and Coeducation in the American West by Andrea G. Radke-Moss

Iowa Digital Library: Archery series, University of Iowa Physical Education for Women digital collection

Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the University of Iowa Department of Physical Education for Women Records, 1900-2006

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

This is the only sport I was ever any good at. — tanya b.

"Women are said to be unable to handle the intellectual rigor of Talmud. When Orthodox women are professors or computer scientists, it makes that argument hard to swallow."

Tags: nyc bookstores

"

The human talent for pattern-recognition is a two-edged sword: We’re especially good at finding patterns, even when they aren’t really there — something known as false pattern-recognition.

We hunger for significance — for signs that our personal existence is of special meaning to the universe. To that end, we’re all too eager to deceive ourselves and others.

"

In the third episode of his fantastic Cosmos series, Neil deGrasse Tyson reminds us of how pattern-recognition both fuels our creativity and makes our minds mislead us.
(via explore-blog)

"Educators say that many parents, especially among the poor and immigrants, do not know that talking, as well as reading, singing and playing with their young children, is important. “I’ve had young moms say, ‘I didn’t know I was supposed to talk to my baby until they could say words and talk to me,’  ” said Susan Landry, director of the Children’s Learning Institute at the University of Texas in Houston, which has developed a home visiting program similar to the one here in Providence."

Trying to Close a Knowledge Gap, Word by Word - NYTimes.com (via infoneer-pulse)

(via infoneer-pulse)